Can a patient has insitu and invasive breast cancer

The answer is no to that. Many in situ breast cancers stay in situ and never develop invasion. But they have the potential to do that. The corollary question is do all invasive cancers, were they preceded by an in situ version. And the answer is they probably were, or most of them were.

Full
Answer

What is the difference between in situ and invasive carcinoma?

In situ vs invasive Carcinomas in situ are not real cancers. The tumor develops from the epithelial cells that line the ducts/lobules, but lack the ability to move (in situ means, literally, in place), so are never invasive (to be invasive is a defining characteristic for cancer).

Is lobular carcinoma in situ an indolent risk factor for breast cancer?

Recent data suggest that lobular carcinoma in situ is an indolent precursor for breast cancer, rather than a pure risk factor. This could imply free surgical margins become important. The risk of contralateral carcinoma and of multifocality of invasive lobular carcinoma is higher than for invasive ductal carcinoma.

What is invasive breast cancer?

Invasive carcinomas, on the other hand, do not stay confined. They break out of the duct or lobule where they first emerged and move to other breast tissues. If not detected and treated, they can move further and invade other organs.

Can in situ carcinoma in situ be treated?

When detected at early stages (before it can turn invasive), a carcinoma in situ has good chance of being successfully treated. That is why it is so important to participate in the recommended cancer screenings programs. The most common in situ carcinoma is the ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).


Can breast cancer be in situ and invasive?

In situ breast cancer (ductal carcinoma in situ or DCIS) is a pre-cancer that starts in a milk duct and has not grown into the rest of the breast tissue. The term invasive (or infiltrating) breast cancer is used to describe any type of breast cancer that has spread (invaded) into the surrounding breast tissue.


Can you have invasive ductal carcinoma and ductal carcinoma in situ?

Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) often presents alone or with a co-existing ductal carcinoma in situ component (IDC + DCIS). Studies have suggested that pure IDC may exhibit different biological behavior than IDC + DCIS, but whether this translates to a difference in outcomes is unclear.


Can in situ cancer become invasive?

DCIS is considered non-invasive or pre-invasive breast cancer. DCIS can’t spread outside the breast, but it is often treated because if left alone, some DCIS cells can continue to undergo abnormal changes that cause it to become invasive breast cancer (which can spread).


What stage is breast cancer in situ?

DCIS is also called intraductal carcinoma or stage 0 breast cancer. DCIS is a non-invasive or pre-invasive breast cancer. This means the cells that line the ducts have changed to cancer cells but they have not spread through the walls of the ducts into the nearby breast tissue.


What is the survival rate for ductal carcinoma in situ?

Although DCIS doesn’t pose any risk, it can turn invasive and spread to other tissues at any time. The five-year survival rate of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), also known as stage 0 breast cancer, is over 98 percent.


What is the life expectancy of invasive ductal carcinoma?

What is the survival rate for invasive ductal carcinoma? The five-year survival rate for localized invasive ductal carcinoma is high — nearly 100% when treated early on. If the cancer has spread to other tissues in the region, the five-year survival rate is 86%.


Can you have DCIS and invasive breast cancer at the same time?

Research shows that the risk of getting invasive cancer is low if you’ve been treated for DCIS. If it isn’t treated, 30% to 50% of women with DCIS will get invasive cancer. The invasive cancer usually develops in the same breast and in the same area as where the DCIS happened.


Which type of breast cancer has the best prognosis?

Grade 1 has the best prognosis. Some breast cancers need your body’s natural hormones estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) to grow. These cancer cells have proteins on the outside of their walls called hormone receptors.


How serious is ductal carcinoma in situ?

DCIS is non-invasive because it hasn’t spread beyond the milk ducts into other healthy tissue. DCIS isn’t life-threatening, but if you’re diagnosed with DCIS, you have a higher-than-average risk of developing invasive breast cancer later in life.


What type breast cancer has the highest recurrence rate?

Research suggests that estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer is more likely to come back more than five years after diagnosis.


What is the best treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ?

Radiation therapy Treatment of DCIS has a high likelihood of success, in most instances removing the tumor and preventing any recurrence. In most people, treatment options for DCIS include: Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) and radiation therapy. Breast-removing surgery (mastectomy)


How long does it take for invasive ductal carcinoma to spread?

Each division takes about 1 to 2 months, so a detectable tumor has likely been growing in the body for 2 to 5 years. Generally speaking, the more cells divide, the bigger the tumor grows.


How long does it take for high grade DCIS to become invasive?

High grade DCIS has a higher risk of becoming invasive cancer within five years after diagnosis, and has a higher risk of recurring after treatment than low or intermediate grade.


What are the chances of getting DCIS in the other breast?

Breast cancer may develop in the patient’s other breast, but only in about 5% of cases. If this happens, the cancer in the second breast is not considered a recurrence, but a new primary breast cancer.


How serious is ductal carcinoma in situ?

DCIS is non-invasive because it hasn’t spread beyond the milk ducts into other healthy tissue. DCIS isn’t life-threatening, but if you’re diagnosed with DCIS, you have a higher-than-average risk of developing invasive breast cancer later in life.


What are the chances of DCIS recurrence after mastectomy?

Efficacy — Mastectomy is curative for over 98 percent of patients with DCIS [15-19]. Disease recurrence is rare after mastectomy (1 to 2 percent) [3,20-22].


How many invasive breast cancers are there?

About 8 in 10 invasive breast cancers are invasive (or infiltrating) ductal carcinomas (IDC). IDC starts in the cells that line a milk duct in the breast. From there, the cancer breaks through the wall of the duct, and grows into the nearby breast tissues.


What are the two most common types of breast cancer?

Most breast cancers are invasive, but there are different types of invasive breast cancer. The two most common are invasive ductal carcinoma and invasive lobular carcinoma.


Is lobular carcinoma harder to detect?

Invasive lobular carcinoma may be harder to detect on physical exam and imaging, like mammograms, than invasive ductal carcinoma. And compared to other kinds of invasive carcinoma, about 1 in 5 women with ILC might have cancer in both breasts.


Is lobular carcinoma invasive?

Invasive lobular carcinoma ( ILC) About 1 in 10 invasive breast cancers is an invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). ILC starts in the milk-producing glands (lobules). Like IDC, it can spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body. Invasive lobular carcinoma may be harder to detect on physical exam and imaging, like mammograms, …


What percentage of breast cancer is invasive?

Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) accounts for about 80% of all invasive breast cancers in women and 90% in men.


What is the most common breast cancer in women?

Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) accounts for about 80% of all invasive breast cancers in women and 90% in men. It begins in the cells of a milk duct, then it grows through the duct walls and into the surrounding breast tissue. It can also spread to other parts of your body.


What Is Invasive Ductal Carcinoma?

Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) accounts for about 80% of all invasive breast cancers in women and 90% in men.


What is Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS)?

Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS), also known as intraductal carcinoma, accounts for one of every five new breast cancer diagnoses. It’s an uncontrolled growth of cells within the breast ducts. It’s noninvasive, meaning it hasn’t grown into the breast tissue outside of the ducts. The phrase “in situ” means “in its original place.”


What Are the Symptoms of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ?

DCIS usually has no symptoms. Most of the time, it’s diagnosed by a mammogram.


What is the name of the cancer that starts in the milk ducts?

Ductal carcinoma is a common type of breast cancer that starts in cells that line the milk ducts, which carry breast milk to the nipple. The symptoms, diagnosis, and treatments for each are different.


What are the different types of ductal carcinoma?

There are two types: 1 Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) 2 Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), also called intraductal carcinoma


What is ductal carcinoma in situ?

Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) About 1 in 5 new breast cancers will be ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Nearly all women with this early stage of breast cancer can be cured. DCIS is also called intraductal carcinoma or stage 0 breast cancer. DCIS is a non-invasive or pre-invasive breast cancer.


Can a DCIS patient have a mastectomy?

In most cases, a woman with DCIS can choose between breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and simple mastectomy.


Is DCIS invasive or noninvasive?

DCIS is a non-invasive or pre-invasive breast cancer. This means the cells that line the ducts have changed to cancer cells but they have not spread through the walls of the ducts into the nearby breast tissue.


Can DCIS be invasive?

However, DCIS can sometimes become an invasive cancer. At that time, the cancer has spread out of the duct into nearby tissue, and from there, it could metastasize to other parts of the body.


Is lobular carcinoma in situ or invasive?

Lobular carcinoma in situ and invasive lobular cancer of the breast. Lobular carcinoma in situ and invasive lobular carcinoma are different entities from ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive lobular carcinoma. Their biological profile should be studied further in order to make the fine tuning of treatment possible.


Is lobular carcinoma risk higher than ductal carcinoma?

This could imply free surgical margins become important. The risk of contralateral carcinoma and of multifocality of invasive lobular carcinoma is higher than for invasive ductal carcinoma.


Can mammography be used for lobular cancer?

Conventional mammography or ultrasonography cannot always give useful preoperative information about the extent of lobular cancers. The value of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging needs to be established for these patients.


Why is breast cancer called DCIS?

Doctors often call this type of breast cancer ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). It gets this name because the cancer is only in the breast ducts that carry milk.


Why do you have a mastectomy instead of a lumpectomy?

Reasons why a doctor might suggest you have a mastectomy instead of a lumpectomy for DCIS include: The cancer covers a large area of the breast. The cancer is in more than one place. The location of the cancer makes it hard for a lumpectomy to have a good cosmetic result.


Will I Need Another Surgery?

It’s possible. Sometimes after a first lumpectomy, a doctor may need to do a second one. This usually happens when the tissue removed in the first surgery doesn’t have enough healthy tissue around it for doctors to be sure they got it all. At this point, you might also consider a mastectomy to make sure all the cancer is gone.


What is the best treatment for DCIS?

Doctors recommend this type of treatment for DCIS that is hormone-receptor-positive — which means it responds to the hormone estrogen.


How long does radiation last for DCIS?

Radiation of the whole breast is the most common treatment. A machine delivers the radiation, often 5 days a week for several weeks . It might be an option to get radiation for only part of the breast. It’s not clear if this works as well as whole breast radiation.


What is the procedure called when you remove the whole breast?

Doctors also call this breast-conserving surgery. Sometimes, a doctor might suggest removing the whole breast. This type of surgery is a mastectomy.


Can you have a breast reconstruction after a mastectomy?

After a lumpectomy or mastectomy, some women may choose to have surgery to reconstruct their breast. The decision to have breast reconstruction is a personal one. It isn’t medically necessary, and it doesn’t have to happen right away. Talk to your doctor about reconstruction to decide if it’s something you may want.


Invasive


Invasive Lobular Carcinoma

  • About 1 in 10 invasive breast cancers is an invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). ILC starts in the breast glands that make milk (lobules). Like IDC, it can spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body. Invasive lobular carcinoma may be harder to detect on physical exam and imaging, like mammograms, than invasive ductal carcinoma. And compared to ot…

See more on cancer.org


Less Common Types of Invasive Breast Cancer

  • There are some special types of breast cancer that are sub-types of invasive carcinoma. They are less common than the breast cancers named above and each typically make up fewer than 5% of all breast cancers. These are often named after features of the cancer cells, like the ways the cells are arranged. Some of these may have a better prognosis than the more common IDC. These in…

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Treating Invasive Breast Cancer

  • Treatment of invasive breast cancer depends on how advanced the cancer is (the stage of the cancer) and other factors. Most women will have some type of surgery to remove the tumor. Depending on the type of breast cancer and how advanced it is, you might need other types of treatment as well, either before or after surgery, or sometimes both. See Treating Breast Cancerf…

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