A modifiable risk factor for breast cancer includes what quizlet

Multiple risk factors for breast cancer are well-established; these include breast density, reproductive (parity and age at first birth), menstrual (menopausal status and age at menarche), and modifiable lifestyle factors such as body mass index (BMI), hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use and alcohol consumption 4 – 6.

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What is the relationship between breast cancer and family history?

Having a first-degree relative (mother, sister, or daughter) with breast cancer almost doubles a woman’s risk. Having 2 first-degree relatives increases her risk about 3-fold. Women with a father or brother who have had breast cancer also have a higher risk of breast cancer.

What are the risk factors that can’t be changed?

Risk Factors You Cannot Change. Having dense breasts. Dense breasts have more connective tissue than fatty tissue, which can sometimes make it hard to see tumors on a mammogram. Women with dense breasts are more likely to get breast cancer.

What are the 5 risk factors for breast cancer?

Risk Factors You Cannot Change 1 Getting older. … 2 Genetic mutations. … 3 Reproductive history. … 4 Having dense breasts. … 5 Personal history of breast cancer or certain non-cancerous breast diseases. … 6 Family history of breast cancer. … 7 Previous treatment using radiation therapy. … More items…

What happens if you have breast cancer in only one breast?

A woman with cancer in one breast has a higher risk of developing a new cancer in the other breast or in another part of the same breast. (This is different from a recurrence or return of the first cancer.) This risk is even higher for younger women with breast cancer.


What is the modifiable risk factor for breast cancer?

Modifiable risk factors : menstrual and reproductive factors, radiation exposure, hormone replacement therapy, alcohol and high fat diet.


Which of the following is a non modifiable risk factor for breast cancer?

Nonmodifiable risk factors: Being female. Age. Personal history of breast cancer.


Which is one of the most important prognostic factors in breast cancer?

The most significant prognostic factor in breast cancer is the presence or absence of axillary lymph node involvement,4 which is usually assessed at the time of surgery using sentinel lymph node biopsy or axillary dissection. Macrometastases (>0.2 cm in size) have clearly been shown to have prognostic significance.


What is MRM breast cancer?

A modified radical mastectomy is a procedure in which the entire breast is removed, including the skin, areola, nipple, and most axillary lymph nodes, but the pectoralis major muscle is spared. Historically, a modified radical mastectomy was the primary method of treatment for breast cancer.


What are modifiable risk factors for cancer?

Modifiable cancer risk factors include health behaviors and lifestyle factors (e.g., tobacco and alcohol use, obesity). Environmental risk factors for cancer such as radiation, infectious agents, and workplace exposures may be non-modifiable or modifiable.


What are modifiable factors?

Modifiable risk factors include: smoking high blood pressure diabetes physical inactivity being overweight high blood cholesterol. The good news is that the effect of many risk factors can be changed (you cannot change the risk factor, only its effect).


What are the prognostic factors of breast cancer?

Abstract. There are several independent but interrelated prognostic factors predictive of recurrence and survival in breast cancer. These include axillary nodal status, histopathology, steroid receptors, proliferative rate, ploidy, and oncogene amplification.


What causes estrogen positive breast cancer?

Breast cancer cells taken out during a biopsy or surgery will be tested to see if they have certain proteins that are estrogen or progesterone receptors. When the hormones estrogen and progesterone attach to these receptors, they stimulate the cancer to grow.


What causes breast cancer?

Women who have inherited changes (mutations) to certain genes, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2, are at higher risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Reproductive history. Starting menstrual periods before age 12 and starting menopause after age 55 expose women to hormones longer, raising their risk of getting breast cancer.


What is the commonest type of breast cancer?

Invasive (or infiltrating) breast cancer has spread into surrounding breast tissue. The most common types are invasive ductal carcinoma and invasive lobular carcinoma. Invasive ductal carcinoma makes up about 70-80% of all breast cancers.


What stage of breast cancer requires a mastectomy?

A mastectomy may be a treatment option for many types of breast cancer, including: Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), or noninvasive breast cancer. Stages I and II (early-stage) breast cancer. Stage III (locally advanced) breast cancer — after chemotherapy.


What is removed during a mastectomy?

Mastectomy is the surgical removal of the entire breast. Some women have the option of mastectomy or lumpectomy (also called breast-conserving surgery) plus radiation therapy, and choose mastectomy.


Which of the following types of cells are most commonly linked to breast cancer?

Most breast cancers are carcinomas, which are tumors that start in the epithelial cells that line organs and tissues throughout the body.


Which of the following cardiovascular risk factors Cannot be changed?

Non-modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors are those that cannot be changed. These include a person’s age, ethnicity and family history (genetics cannot be changed), among other factors.


Which of the following is a risk factor of colon cancer?

Lack of regular physical activity. A diet low in fruit and vegetables. A low-fiber and high-fat diet, or a diet high in processed meats. Overweight and obesity.


What is the common cause of skin cancer?

Most skin cancers are caused by too much exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays. To lower your risk of getting skin cancer, you can protect your skin from UV rays from the sun and from artificial sources like tanning beds and sunlamps.


Who Is at High Risk for Breast Cancer?

If you have a strong family history of breast cancer or inherited changes in your BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, you may have a high risk of getting breast cancer. You may also have a high risk for ovarian cancer.


How old do you have to be to get breast cancer?

Getting older. The risk for breast cancer increases with age; most breast cancers are diagnosed after age 50.


What are the genetic mutations?

Genetic mutations. Inherited changes (mutations) to certain genes, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2. Women who have inherited these genetic changes are at higher risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Reproductive history.


Is it possible to get breast cancer a second time?

Women who have had breast cancer are more likely to get breast cancer a second time. Some non-cancerous breast diseases such as atypical hyperplasia or lobular carcinoma in situ are associated with a higher risk of getting breast cancer. Family history of breast or ovarian cancer. A woman’s risk for breast cancer is higher if she has a mother, …


Can you get breast cancer without other risk factors?

Some women will get breast cancer even without any other risk factors that they know of. Having a risk factor does not mean you will get the disease, and not all risk factors have the same effect. Most women have some risk factors, but most women do not get breast cancer. If you have breast cancer risk factors, …


Can you get breast cancer if you are not physically active?

Not being physically active. Women who are not physically active have a higher risk of getting breast cancer. Being overweight or obese after menopause. Older women who are overweight or obese have a higher risk of getting breast cancer than those at a normal weight. Taking hormones.


Does night shift work increase breast cancer risk?

Research suggests that other factors such as smoking, being exposed to chemicals that can cause cancer, and changes in other hormones due to night shift working also may increase breast cancer risk.


Risk Factors You Cannot Change


Risk Factors You Can Change

  1. Not being physically active.Women who are not physically active have a higher risk of getting breast cancer.
  2. Being overweight or having obesity after menopause. Older women who are overweight or have obesityhave a higher risk of getting breast cancer than those at a normal weight.
  3. Taking hormones.Some forms of hormone replacement therapy (those that include both estr…
  1. Not being physically active.Women who are not physically active have a higher risk of getting breast cancer.
  2. Being overweight or having obesity after menopause. Older women who are overweight or have obesityhave a higher risk of getting breast cancer than those at a normal weight.
  3. Taking hormones.Some forms of hormone replacement therapy (those that include both estrogen and progesterone) taken during menopause can raise risk for breast cancer when taken for more than five y…
  4. Reproductive history.Having the first pregnancy after age 30, not breastfeeding, and never having a full-term pregnancy can raise breast cancer risk.


Who Is at High Risk For Breast Cancer?

  • If you have a strong family history of breast cancer or inherited changes in your BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, you may have a high risk of getting breast cancer. You may also have a high risk for ovarian cancer. Talk to your doctor about ways to reduce your risk, such as medicines that block or decrease estrogen in your body, or surgery.external icon

See more on cdc.gov

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